Category Archives: ACIP

ACIP drops recommendation of LAIV/nasal spray for 2016-2017 flu season

 

As many of you already know, ACIP voted to remove Flumist® from the list of recommended flu presentations for the 2016-2017 season. More specifically:

“CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) today voted that live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), also known as the “nasal spray” flu vaccine, should not be used during the 2016-2017 flu season. ACIP continues to recommend annual flu vaccination, with either the inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) or recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV), for everyone 6 months and older. ACIP is a panel of immunization experts that advises the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This ACIP vote is based on data showing poor or relatively lower effectiveness of LAIV from 2013 through 2016.”

-www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2016/s0622-laiv-flu.html

 

To help you better communicate this message to your patients and staff, here are two excellent primer articles:

1. “No Flu Nasal Spray Next Season: Why Is This Vaccine Not Working?” Livescience.com, June 23, 2016, www.livescience.com/55176-flu-nasal-spray-not-working.html

2. “Intranasal FluMISSED its target.” aappublications.org, July 12, 2016, www.aappublications.org/news/2016/07/12/LAIV071216

If you have further questions about how this will affect your clinic’s state-supplied flu order, please call Jennifer Steinbock at 971-673-0309.

 

 

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Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Update

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) meets quarterly to discuss, inform and determine how United States vaccines can best be utilized. Here are some brief notes about the decisions made by the ACIP in June. Full ACIP proceedings and recommendations can be found here: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/acip/index.html

Meningitis B vaccines: Rather than a blanket recommendation for routine vaccination, ACIP voted to enact a permissive recommendation “A serogroup B meningococcal (MenB) vaccine series may be administered to adolescents and young adults 16 through 23 years of age to provide short term protection against most strains of serogroup B meningococcal disease. The preferred age for MenB vaccines is 16 through 18 years.” http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/programs/vfc/downloads/resolutions/2015-06-15-mening.pdf

Influenza: The spacing and number of doses for individuals six months through eight years of age was simplified: If a child between six months and nine years old has ever had two doses in any previous season(s), even if not consecutive seasons, only one dose is needed in the current season. CDC has no preference for any one flu vaccine brand or presentation over another.

Pneumococcal: The spacing of pneumococcal vaccines for adults 65 years and older has changed from a minimum of eight weeks, to 12 months between PCV 13 and PPSV23. This brings the recommendation into line with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) payment program. Adults 65 and older are recommended for a 2-dose series of one dose of each pneumococcal vaccine at least 12 months apart. CMS will fund one of each as long as the two doses are at least 11 months apart. Both pneumococcal vaccines cannot be given at the same visit. ACIP promotes giving adults 65 and older the recommended pneumococcal vaccine at the same visit as the flu vaccine. For details see page 8 and 10 of the pneumococcal vaccine standing orders.

Tdap: ACIP again considered routine TDAP boosters for adolescents and adults, but opted to maintain the recommendation for only one adult booster dose and a Tdap booster dose with each pregnancy.

Zoster (Shingles): Merck is proceeding with an application to the Federal Drug Administration for a new inactivated, adjuvanted 2-dose vaccine that shows 97% protection levels. This new vaccine may be recommended for stem cell recipients in the future. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa013441

HPV: No changes. Clinicians can complete any HPV 3-dose series with either HPV2, HPV4 or HPV9 for women and any HPV4 or HPV9 for men.

Yellow Fever: ACIP voted that a single primary dose of yellow fever vaccine provides long-lasting protection and is adequate for most travelers. See the MMWR for specifics on high-risk populations. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6423a5.htm

General Recommendations: ACIP approved the entire document. This is an update to the July 2011 issue. Some of the areas of change relate to Altered Immunocompetence based upon the IDSA Clinical Practice Guidelines published in 2013. New conditions, medications, and combination therapies were added as well as guidelines of when to withhold select vaccines, including both live and inactivated vaccines. http://www.pharmacist.com/updates-vaccine-recommendations-focus-acips-june-meeting?desktop_view=no

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